Alternative für Deutschland

Why I support the AfD

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2018-11-23 19:53

AfD leaders hold a news conference with a generally hostile press.


By Carolyn Yeager

GERMANY NEEDS TO CHANGE. That is, the political philosophy that governs Germany needs to change. The current philosophy is internationalist and guided by remembrance of WWII “crimes”, especially the Holocaust slander. The change I want to see is to a pro-German Germany, a more nationalist Germany. The new party Alternative for Germany (AfD), described as populist, can bring about this change in an unobjectionable way. Yes, the Jews will scream, the left will scream, the communists will scream – but since AfD has no connection with Nazism, since it rejects any return to National Socialism, the party is not in any way 'unconstitutional' … unless and until being pro-German (or even being German!) becomes unconstitutional.

German establishment tries to create scandal around AfD star Alice Weidel

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2018-11-17 11:33

By  Carolyn Yeager

AS THE AFD'S ANNUAL PARTY CONFERENCE BEGAN in Magdeburg on Friday, one issue on the agenda is dealing with the improper donation charges being thrown around  by the other parties and the media, particularly the Deutsche Welle (DW) International broadcaster and it's allies.

I have already read at least three full articles at DW claiming improper handling of Swiss donations by Weidel's campaign. Alice Weidel (pictured) was elected to the Bundestag from the Lake Constance district, which is right on the border with Switzerland. I don't see anyone else playing this up to the extent that DW is doing. As the AfD has risen, DW seems to be intent on its own campaign of talking down and posing AfD as a threat to the Federal Republic's constitutional order.

President Trump led in rejecting UN Global Migration Pact—Hungary and now Austria follow

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2018-11-01 00:55

Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz (left) and vice-chancellor HC Strache announce they are following in the footsteps of leaders from the United States and Hungary by a decision not to sign the UN Migration Compact in December.


By Carolyn Yeager

THE UN MIGRATION COMPACT FOR SAFE, ORDERLY AND REGULAR MIGRATION was approved in July by all 193 UN members except the United States. Later Victor Orban of Hungary said he would not sign the final document, which signing ceremony is to take place in Marrakesh, Morocco in December. Now Sebastian Kurz, chancellor of Austria, has announced that his country has decided not to sign it and will not send a representative to Morocco for the event. Poland is also indicating that it will probably decide the same. [Update: https://www.dw.com/en/merkel-meets-polish-pm-as-he-threatens-withdrawal-from-un-migration-pact/a-46135819]

The compact, which calls mass migration “inevitable, necessary, and desirable,” is made up of 23 goals, some of which definitely infringe upon the sovereignty of first world nations. Austria, in making its Oct. 31 announcement said that 17 of those goals are unacceptable to its government, led by Kurz's conservative Peoples Party in coalition with vice-chancellor Hans-Christian Strache's populist Freedom Party.

AfD wins largest increase from 2013 in Hesse regional election with 13%

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2018-10-28 20:57

Natalia Meuthen (left), wife of AfD co-chairman Joerg Meuthen (center), and AfD state chairman Klaus Herrmann celebrate after the state election in the German state of Hesse in Wiesbaden, western Germany, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. The nationalist Alternative for Germany, AfD, were elected into the parliament for the first time. (Frank Rumpenhorst/dpa via AP)


UPDATE - Angela Merkel has announced she will not run again for CDU Chairman at the party's annual meeting in December. At last, at last! She says she will remain Chancellor until her term expires in 2021 but, of course, if her government coalition falls apart at any time, there could be a call for new elections. The CDU made a historically poor performance in the last two state elections.


by Carolyn Yeager

BUT YOU WOULDN'T KNOW IT FROM READING THE GERMAN NEWS OUTLETS, who are all playing down the Alternative for Germany's success since it wasn't the big winner of the night and “only came in 4th” out of six parties that earned the minimum 5%. They fail to mention the AfD's +9 point increase from 2013, which is greater than the 8.5 point increase being so wildly celebrated for the liberal Green Party.

The fact that the Greens won between 19 and 20 per cent of the total vote in this Western Germany state, equaling the result for the declining Social Democratic Party (which lost eleven percent from 2013 – the biggest loser in that regard!) is enough reason for the press to accord them the title of big winner of this election. Well, the Greens probably took their substantial increase directly from the Reds!

AfD's Gauland says Merkel's demand for election campaign control is absurd

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2018-10-18 21:35

CHANCELLOR ANGELA MERKEL HAS ANNOUNCED GUIDELINES FOR DEALING WITH PARTIES that allegedly engage in disinformation in election campaigns, which would bring financial sanctions into play.

AfD national spokesman Alexander Gauland  (right) said in Berlin on Oct. 18:

"If it is up to the Chancellor, opposition parties will soon have to submit their campaign material to the government for consideration. Presumably, a 'Ministry of Truth' will be set up for this purpose. That is not an absurd statement.”

He added, “Merkel's announcement shows how tense the nerves of the old parties are in the face of their continuing decline. Apparently, the current popular parties no longer trust their own arguments, but see in them their last chance to discredit the political opponent.

Mixed results in Bavaria's election indicate typical German caution

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2018-10-14 14:27

33-year-old Bavarian Green party leader Katharina Schulze is young and vivacious.  Neither the AfD nor the other parties had such a charismatic leader on display.


By Carolyn Yeager

The biggest gainer in today's Baravian state election is the left-wing Green Party with a current gain of around 9 points over its 2013 result. That is, if you don't include the gain of over 10 points by the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, which rose from zero in 2013 since they were not on the ballot then.

The AfD was only formed in 2013 and in those five years has risen to a position hovering between 2nd and 3rd most popular in Germany as a whole. In conservative Bavaria today, though, they came in fourth, following closely behind a right-leaning Southern Germany party called "Free Voters."

Interview: AfD's Alexander Gauland accepts that Hitler 'killed six million Jews'—How is never asked

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2018-08-16 15:51

By Carolyn Yeager

I SUPPORT AND APPLAUD THE AfD (Alternative fuer Deutschland party) because it's the only thing that is moving Germany out of it's stuck state of post-war guilt and perennial apology. Since I know it is not possible for a politician to defend Adolf Hitler or question a single element of the Holocaust false narrative in Germany—nor in any Western country, for that matter—without committing political suicide, I don't expect any to do so. Still, someone like Bjorn Höcke manages to criticize indirectly these very sacred cows and party head Alexander Gauland has always defended him and prevented him from being excluded from the party. So overall, Dr. Gauland (born in 1941) is a seasoned politician and positive force; I wish him continued vigor and ability to lead the party.

Multiculturalism backfiring? Scandals arise in Germany, Holland

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2018-07-23 23:06

Mesut Özil, left, hands a shirt over to Recep Tayyip Erdogan on May 13, during Erdogan's visit to the UK prior to the presidential election in Turkey. This photograph was criticized in Germany as demonstrating a dual loyalty to both countries, which Özil does not deny.


 UPDATE: Mesut Özil spoke with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on the phone Monday after he quit Germany's national team, the Turkish leader told reporters in parliament on Tuesday (today). Erdogan praised Özil's decision to quit.

By Carolyn Yeager

LAST WEEK, A TURKISH PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLER who was born in Germany but has been living in England earning a huge salary under contract for the English club Arsenal – but also is one of the top players on the German National soccer team – accused Germany of racism and announced he would no longer play on its national team.

At the same time in The Netherlands, the Dutch Foreign Minister aroused a storm of criticism over his comments about the failure of multicultural societies. “Give me an example of a multiethnic, multicultural society, where the indigenous population still live … where they live in a peaceful, societal union,” he said to a gathering in The Hague. “I don’t know of any.”

July 20: German Social Democrats commemorate 1944 traitor-assassins as founders of the current EU

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2018-07-20 23:12

In the courtyard of the Bendlerblock, July 20th. Main plotters' portraits visible among the floral arrangements, left to right, Friedrich Olbricht, Ludwig Beck, Claus von Stauffenberg, Werner von Haeften.


By Carolyn Yeager

THE DATE OF JULY 20TH IS USUALLY PASSED FAIRLY QUIETLY IN GERMANY. But this year, although not a milestone year, it's being played up more strongly, possibly because of the important Bavarian state election coming up in October amid fear of strong support for the nationalistic AfD party.

Deutsche Welle writes that it is “usually framed as a celebration of the re-establishment of justice in Germany following the aberration of Nazism, but this year there was a clear note of defiance against new far-right populism in Europe and around the world.”

AfD Party Congress decides on Erasmus Foundation affiliation

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2018-07-02 00:16

AfD support is growing in Germany and they are planning for the future.


By Carolyn Yeager

I've found a website that might make my reporting on Germany a little easier—it is Free West Media. Possibly an improvement over the so-biased Deutsche Welle.

The Alternative fuer Deutschland (AfD) held it's annual party congress in Augsburg over the weekend and the big news was the decision to formally recognize the Desiderius Erasmus Foundation (DES) as its only party foundation. It rejected the idea of a party-based foundation.

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