War Crimes

We remember the worst war crime in human history—the firebombing of Dresden, February 13-15, 1945

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2018-02-11 13:41

ON THE EVENING OF FEBRUARY 13, 1945, A SERIES OF ALLIED FIREBOMBING RAIDS BEGAN AGAINST THE GERMAN CITY OF DRESDEN, reducing the “Florence of the Elbe” to rubble and flames, and killing as many as 135,000 people. It was the single most destructive bombing of the [most destructive] war [in history]—including Hiroshima and Nagasaki—and all the more horrendous because little, if anything, was accomplished strategically, since the Germans were already on the verge of surrender. [From History.com]

In remembrance and protest, I present this first hand, eyewitness account by survivor Margaret Freyer which I found here and which I think does justice to the unspeakable horror forced on over a million unarmed German citizens and refugees by the governments of (firstly) Great Britain under Winston Churchill and (secondly) the USA, under Franklin D. Roosevelt. I cannot condemn these men and their governments enough, even though 73 years have now passed since this terror was perpetrated on innocent souls.

An apology and admission of wrongdoing, which has never come, is certainly in order. -Carolyn Yeager

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 6

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-07-27 20:06
 
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July 27, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 11 and 12. Chapter 11 is titled “Investigations of German War Crimes” which discusses Adolf Hitler's “Order Number 1” (which was not a war crime but allows de Zayas to bring up the concentration camps and alleged “extermination of Jews”); alleged war crimes in North Africa; the status of medical personnel; alleged crimes during the Allied invasion of Europe and at Malmedy.

Chapter 12, titled “Wehrmacht Conceptions of Postwar International Law,” covers ideas that were being developed for a more German-friendly Convention of international laws of war. The current laws, they thought, represented British interests. 1h13m

Below: Unidentified prisoners of war (POW's) whom are supposed to be protected by the Geneva Convention.