Giesler on Speer: The Battle of the Architects

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-06-21 12:32

Hermann Giesler on left; Albert Speer on right, both in their NSDAP uniform and wearing the Golden Party Badge.

In his memoir about the Adolf Hitler he knew (Ein Anderer Hitler), Hermann Giesler devoted a section to his difficult relationship with architect Albert Speer. Divided into six parts, it covers 42 pages, from pg. 318 to 360. Wilhelm Kriessmann translated the entire section in 201l, but we decided not to include it as part of our series from Ein Anderer Hitler, but to publish it separately. However, Willis Carto never decided to buy the right to publish it in The Barnes Review, as he did the others, even after we condensed only selected parts of it.

Thus it is that now, several years later, I am finally getting back to this project and putting what I consider the most relevant parts of Giesler's commentary on Speer into shape for publication on my website. I will first post these parts separately in the blog, and then archive them under Ein Anderer Hitler.

"Hitler's Table Talk" Study Hour: Episode 15

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2014-06-19 11:38
 
00:00

June 19, 2014

Ray Goodwin and Carolyn Yeager read and comment on the Nov. 19th-Dec. 14th 1941 dinner table monologues by the German Leader, as taken down in shorthand by trusted aide, attorney Heinrich Heim. Topics included in this episode:

  • The Struggle for Power, the necessity to follow Nature's laws, and the peculiar German sense of duty;

  • Hitler tells stories about the Party's trip to Coburg in 1922, the Volkischer Beobachter NSDAP newspaper, and the reason for uniforms;

  • On Germans married to Jews, and the Jewish role as a destroyer;

  • Highest aim of every man should be the preservation of the species;

  • Catholic Church better at appreciating culture and beauty than the Protestant.

Image: Hitler ordered the Coburg Badge to be struck on October 14, 1932 to memorialize the event which took place ten years earlier. In Nov. 1936, he listed the top NSDAP awards  in this order: 1. Coburg Badge; 2. Nürnberg Party Badge of 1929; 3. SA Treffen at Brunswick 1931; 4. Golden Party Badge; 5. The Blood Order

The edition of Hitler's Table Talk being used was translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens, published by Enigma Books, New York, and can be found as a pdf here.

Latest Revisionist News

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2014-06-18 08:10

A great new site has just come online:

Go there and check it out!

www.holocausthoaxmuseum.com

The first Holo-truth museum to compete with all those thousands of Holo-lie museums!

Consider contributing financially to help it grow!

No telling what it might accomplish with all our help.

The Heretics' Hour: Historical Deceptions Uphold Political Power

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2014-06-16 18:40
 
00:00

June 16, 2004

Vladimir Putin has to kneel to do his part in a wreath-laying ceremony to honor the 10,000 Polish Army officers executed by Stalin at Katyn.

Carolyn investigates the kind of people who become "Holocaust" Revisionists, especially looking at the lack of Eastern Europeans who seem unwilling to refute any part of the official historical narrative. Some highlights:

  • Dariusz Ratajczak was a brave Polish historian who was an exception to the rule;
  • Paul Grubach wonders if currently anti-Russian Ukrainians might become more open to "holocaust" revisionism;
  • Palestinian's article in Bradley Smith's Report is shockingly pro-"holocaust" and anti-"Nazi";
  • David Cole's new book reveals him to be just another attention-seeking Jew who follows the tribal line;
  • Klaus Lund, long-time Swedish National-Socialist with Scandinavian group "Nordfront" says N-S must adapt to "prevailing conditions".

Saturday Afternoon: British-German disputes as background to WWI

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-06-14 12:46
 
00:00

June 14, 2014

With Guest Paul Hickman. Carolyn and Paul start with the Naval Defence Act of 1889 and from there trace some of the tensions that built up between the UK and Germany. Some of the events and "personality clashes" that are discussed are:

"Hitler's Table Talk" Study Hour: Episode 14

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2014-06-12 16:21
 
00:00

June 12, 2014

Carolyn Yeager and Ray Goodwin read and comment on the November 11th-16th, 1941 dinner table conversations and monologues by the German Leader, taken down in shorthand by trusted aide, attorney Heinrich Heim.  Some highlights of this episode:

  • Monarchy is an out-of-date form - example, the Thuringian Royal House lived off the state;
  • Keeping the friendship of the Church is too costly, but we're glad to have its cultural monuments - the great Cathedrals;
  • Frederick the Great's reaction against the Church in defense of the State was definitive;
  • The Germanic Spirit will penetrate the East and bring the people all they need;
  • The success of the Four Year Plan is explained by setting everybody to work within a closed circle economy, not by rearmament;
  • Too many officials, too much paperwork - Hitler wants more local autonomy;
  • Legal system is too lenient; there are no "extenuating circumstances" for treason.

The edition of Hitler's Table Talk being used was translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens, published by Enigma Books, New York, and can be found as a pdf here.

The Heretics' Hour: Traitors and Misfits - July 20th Conspirators

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2014-06-09 18:04
 
00:00

June 9, 2014

Carolyn looks at the members of the anti-Hitler faction in Germany, dominated by high-level military officers, and asks how they got away with their assassination plots for so long. She also asks: Can a consensus of opinion ever be reached, even among similar people? Some ideas covered:

  • What makes a traitor?
  • Of 30 top leaders, 20 held high military rank (Colonel or above) and 10 were diplomats and Chiefs of Police;
  • It's all in how you view it -to them, they were the loyalists and Hitler was the traitor;
  • While they didn't want the Jews around, they also didn't want to harm them;
  • They believed Germany's enemies were only against Hitler, and wanted the same things they, as Germans, did;
  • Their efforts to remain undetected may have hampered their success in achieving their goal.

Image: At Rastenburg on 15 July 1944. Stauffenberg at left, Hitler center, Keitel on right. The person shaking hands with Hitler is General Karl Bodenschatz, who was seriously wounded five days later, by Stauffenberg's bomb. Enlarge

Saturday Afternoon: The German who lost D-Day

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-06-07 12:52
 
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June 7, 2014

On the 70th anniversary of the Allied landing  on Normandy's coast, known as D-Day, which was Friday, June 6, Carolyn looks at the possibility of treason as the reason for the poor Wehrmacht response to the invasion. Highlights include:

  • Generals and even Field Marshals serving in Northwest France in anticipation of the 1944 invasion were the same ones who participated in the July 20, 1944 assassination attempt on Hitler;
  • Most likely of all to be helping the enemy was Lt. General Hans Speidel, FM Erwin Rommel's Chief of Staff, who had authority while Rommel was away and was slow to pass on information;
  • An unusual number of key leaders were away from their headquarters on June 6, but the weather was thought unfavorable for a landing;
  • Hans Speidel was released by the French after the war and in 1957 was named Commander of the Allied Forces, Central Europe, an important NATO post, held until 1963;
  • The last installment of Oblt. Leopold Wenger's letters from the front have been published - comments are welcomre.

Image: Lt. General Hans Speidel and FM Erwin Rommel, with Gen. Lang between, at Pas-de-Calais in April 1944. Enlarge

Leopold Wenger's last letters from the Eastern Front, Aug. 1944-Jan. 1945

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2014-06-06 15:26

Poldi Wenger receives the Knights Cross from Generaloberst Otto Dessloch, Chief of Luftflotte 4, on 19 January, 1945, assisted by the General's adjutant.

copyright 2014 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager
Translated from the German by Carlos Whitlock Porter

First, an account of the fall of Sevastopol and the loss of Ukraine by the end of June 1944, assembled by Willy Wenger. The letters that follow, the last ones Leopold Wenger wrote to his family, spanned August '44 to January '45. Poldi had been in Ukraine since November 1943, relocating only slowly westward, but now his Group begins to move around, first to Poland, finally closer to Vienna.

Sevastopol Falls

In six to eight weeks, the situation looked quite different. The Allies had landed in Normandy. On 5 May, the 2nd [Russian] Guard Army went on the offensive on the west side of Sevastopol. On 7 May, the [Soviet] 51st Army and Coastal Army expanded their offensives to Balaklava and conquered the crest of the Sapun mountains, with which the German commanders, two years before, had sealed the [fate of the] siege. The German commanders now abandoned their lines all the way to Inkerman, where they intended to regroup for a counterattack, after gaining the relative security of the commanding mountain heights. The situation of the defenders was desperate. One German division after the other gave way. On 8 May, General Schörner issued an order to the Navy and Luftwaffe to make the best of a bad job. On 9 May, the Soviets liberated Sevastopol. A single German unit fought a rearguard action for four days on the Kherson peninsula to permit the embarkation of survivors.

Category 

World War II

"Hitler's Table Talk" Study Hour: Episode 13

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2014-06-05 16:07
 
00:00

June 5, 2014

Hitler talks about the effect of diet on disease in this episode. Here he dines out of doors with his officers as ordinary soldiers look on; the short officer in the background must be Helmuth Stieff, later executed for treason. They are having soup (a Führer favorite) with fresh fruit on the table. 

Ray Goodwin and Carolyn Yeager read and comment on the Nov. 2nd-6th 1941 dinner table monologues by the German Leader, as taken down in shorthand by trusted aide, attorney Heinrich Heim. Topics included in this episode:

  •  The dimensions of Europe have changed over the years;
  •  Criminals cannot be tolerated in society during wartime but juvenile criminals need special treatment;
  •  Diet and long life, and freedom from disease;
  •  Progress of the Germanic race and peculiarities of the Jewish mind;
  •  Standards for promotion, and fairness in handing out awards

The edition of Hitler's Table Talk being used was translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens, published by Enigma Books, New York, and can be found as a pdf here.

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