Immigration

Saturday Afternoon: Günter Deckert on the German elections, Asylum Seekers and More

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-10-19 11:39
 
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Oct. 19, 2013

Günter Deckert in Germany says the September general elections brought surprises in the form of losses for the liberal party (what we in the U.S. might call libertarians) and the socialists. He spoke about conditions in Germany today as they relate to national sovereignty. Some highlights of the program:

  • Both the Libs and the anti-EU party failed to reach the 5% mark, so lost all representation in the parliament;
  • In the Bundestag, 35 members are not of German ancestry – most of these are Turks, two are now black African;
  • Germany pays 28% of EU debts, Spain 12%, Malta 3%, yet with equal voting power – and, for example, if Spain cannot pay it’s allotted amount, Germany must pay 28% of Spain’s portion;
  • Germany appears from the outside to be a prosperous country, but it has 5-6 million unemployed Germans, plus all the immigrants of whom over 25% of those under 25 years are unemployed;
  • Asylum-seekers increasingly come from North Africa where strong leaders have been deposed, encouraging civil war to rage (not by accident?);
  • Cost so far of the “National-Socialist Underground” Prozess (investigation and trial) is 20 million euro, yet murder weapon still presents a problem;
  • Jewish newspapers are government-subsidized and Jews continue to up their demands for money;
  • Atomic Energy ban in favor of Wind/Sun is making energy more expensive – average user pays 200 euro a year more than before.
  • Günter's book about his latest six months in Mannheim prison will be available soon.

Email Günter at: [email protected]

NSU victims' families continue to play the "Holocaust" theme

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2013-10-16 09:36

By Carolyn Yeager

What is the "Holocaust" theme? To make the Germans feel guilty! The media coverage of the NSU trial since the court in Munich reconvened in September after their month-long summer holiday seems to have dried up. I just found this article at Deutsche Welle from Oct. 1, 2013, from which I have liberally quoted.

Ismail Yozgat, father of Halit Yozgat who was murdered in his Internet cafe in Kassel in 2006, puts on a great show of emotion, Turkish-style, as he talks about his son.

Family members are now testifying in the Munich court and being given every consideration and opportunity to express their feelings. For instance, the father of slain Halit Yozgat calculatedly used his testimony to give an emotional account of how he found his 21-year-old son dead in his Internet cafe 7 years ago. He even went as far as to get out of his seat and lie down on the courtroom floor to demonstrate the position in which he found his son.

"Why did they kill my son?" He asked the courtroom, his voice choked by tears.

Then he looked towards the five accused and, addressing them directly asked: "What gave you the right to do this?"

"German" Turks want dual citizenship and political clout

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2013-07-21 14:58

A Muslim Turkish family portrait: Levent Bayram, wife and kids

The following was taken from Deutsche Welle's report: Germany's Turks favor duel citizenship at http://www.dw.de/germanys-turks-favor-dual-citizenship/a-16954911

German law only grants dual citizenship in exceptional circumstances. It's often a problem for German Turks, many of whom feel marginalized as they don't want to give up their Turkish passports.

Levent Bayram is 39 years old. He was born in Berlin in the 1970s, when children born to immigrants in Germany had no choice but to take on their parents' nationality, regardless of where they were born.

Levent still only has a Turkish passport, as he was never naturalized in Germany. If he was to become German, he would have to renounce his Turkish passport. It's not an option for him, as he has "such a strong emotional connection to his parents' home country," he tells DW.

Levent spent a few years working in Turkey selling books and telephones. Now he works as a social media manager for the German-Turkish Journal in Berlin, but he doesn't want to lose touch with Turkish culture. For him, a Turkish passport symbolizes and strengthens that connection.

Category 

Immigration, Germany, Race

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