World War II

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 6

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-07-27 20:06
 
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July 27, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 11 and 12. Chapter 11 is titled “Investigations of German War Crimes” which discusses Adolf Hitler's “Order Number 1” (which was not a war crime but allows de Zayas to bring up the concentration camps and alleged “extermination of Jews”); alleged war crimes in North Africa; the status of medical personnel; alleged crimes during the Allied invasion of Europe and at Malmedy.

Chapter 12, titled “Wehrmacht Conceptions of Postwar International Law,” covers ideas that were being developed for a more German-friendly Convention of international laws of war. The current laws, they thought, represented British interests. 1h14m

Below: Unidentified prisoners of war (POW's) whom are supposed to be protected by the Geneva Convention.

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 5

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-07-20 13:00
 
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July 20, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 9 and 10. Chapter 9, "The Bureau and War Crimes Trials," describes what went into the decisions to hold trials against prisoners of war in German custody. It's divided into sections for Polish, French, British & American, and Russian POW's.

Chapter 10 discusses reprisal actions by the Wehrmacht troops, many of which were threatened but never carried out. De Zayas continues to show his moderate bias for the Allied side and against Adolf Hitler's N-S regime. 1h4m

Rudolf Lehmann was a respectable German jurist who was Judge Advocate General of the Wehrmacht in WWII. He joined the NSDAP in 1935, was arrested by the Americans in 1945, found guilty of war crimes at the Nuremberg High Command trial in 1947. Sentenced to 7 years imprisonment, he was released in 1950, as was typical.

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 4

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-07-06 19:58
 
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July 6, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 7 and 8, having to do with how Bureau investigations were used by the German government and by the Wehrmacht.

Chapt. 7 talks about White Books and White Papers which were put out by the German Foreign Office. One unexpected and disappointing development was that when photographs of the atrocities committed on Germans in Poland were published in the White Books, there was such an outcry over the "horror pictures" that Germany stopped adding those images. Naturally, since the Germans didn't commit mutilations on their enemies, the other side didn't have such pictures to print.

Chapt. 8 is about the use of Bureau investigations for "Diplomatic Protection" for prisoners of war, the wounded, medical personnel, etc. A number of examples of protests are given, on both the West and East Fronts (South too). Something I did not know: "thousands of German POW's had already been liquidated by Soviet forces in the first weeks of fighting." 47m36s

Image: A German White book from the First World War, 1914. I could not find a single image of a WWII White Book. Are they outlawed? Enlarge

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 3

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-06-29 19:41
 
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June 29, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 5 and 6. Chapter 5, "The Testimony of Witnesses," looks into how credible witness testimony was obtained by the judges. All witnesses took a "real" oath, and the judges sought verification for all testimony, sometimes going to great length to do so.

Chapter 6, "Expert Medical Opinion" explains how medical officers distinguish the nature of wounds, whether from battle or deliberate mutilation, whether inflicted before or after death. The most common mutilations (which occurred daily on the Eastern Front) were the gouging out of eyes and the cutting off of genitals. Severing feet and hands was also carried out by the savage Russian and Jewish partisans. 1hr12m

Left: Corporal Hans Muth, victim of mutilation: medical examination determined that his eyes had been deliberately put out while he was unconcious.

 

What will be the fate of Kevin Wheatcroft's incredible "Nazi" collection?

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2015-06-27 16:40

Kevin Wheatcroft stands in his private home in England in 2015, next to what he says was Adolf Hitler's favorite war portrait of himself. Enlarge

What will happen to Kevin Wheatcroft's' amazing collection of World War II German military vehicles and National-Socialist memorabilia now that he is publicizing it to the world?

The hefty Mr. Wheatcroft is 55 years old, and looks to me like a pretty good candidate for a heart attack in the next 10 years. How will he preserve what he has spent his life collecting? -with more heartfelt feelings than financial ones, it appears. The son of a WWII British "war hero" and his German war bride, he told a Guardian newspaper reporter that "Adolf and Hermann" are "my real love." If that is true, we can expect Mr. Wheatcroft to have a care about what happens to his collection.

Will he build and endow a museum (or two) to permanently house it all? But what can stop the Jewish-British government from confiscating the whole she-bang and destroying it? Or turning any museum he creates into a "documentation center" which tells the whole story as a criminal enterprise by "Adolf and Hermann" (and company).

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - part 2

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2015-06-26 20:23
 
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June 26, 2015

Carolyn reads chapters 3 and 4. Chapter three is titled "Related German Agencies" and describes the numerous other official agencies with whom the War Crimes Bureau collaborated, and how cooperation was carried out.

Chapter four, "Methods of Obtaining Evidence" tells us how cases were built and gives some vivid examples of mutilations and other outrages committed against German soldiers on the East, West and South Fronts. The bulk of the testimony (approx. 85%) came from ten's of thousands of sworn witnesses giving depositions to military judges or local courts. 1hr12m

The Wehrmacht War Crimes Bureau, 1939-1945 - 1st Installment

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-06-22 19:32
 
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June 22, 2015

In this first installment, Carolyn reads selections from the Introduction by Alfred de Zayas and the full content of chapters one and two. Some highlights:

  • Some history of war crimes investigations from WWI;
  • Learning from that war, the German govt. established a new war crimes bureau on Sept. 4, 1939;
  • Name, history and statements from some of the Wehrmacht judges;
  • The author's negative attitude toward the Third Reich and praise for members of the resistance brings up some issues;
  • Hitler's "Barbarossa Decree" of 13 Sept. 1941 is read in full and discussed. 1h33m

An idealist and United Nations advisor, Alfred de Zayas today still has hope for Democracy and the sovereignty of nations.

The Heretics' Hour: Part 2 of Ray Goodwin reading Hitler's May 1944 Platterhof address to officers

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2015-06-15 20:01
 
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June 15, 2015

Hitler Youth at Nuremberg Party Day in 1935: the future German leadership before the Jews brought about world war against them. enlarge

Carolyn and Ray conclude this special reading of Adolf Hitler's private address to Generals and officers on May 26, 1944. In the second half, Hitler emphasizes how he overcame the class system in Germany, and the opportunities for advancement that exist for ALL German folk. He talked frankly about the need for his Jewish program and called it ruthless but not cruel, making the point that kindness to the Jews meant cruelty to his own people.

He encourages his officers to care for their soldiers as he cares for the German people.

In this 2nd part we find that Veronica Clark changed the word "Volk" to "Rasse" (People to Race) in her translation that she is selling in a book. We also find that Hitler never mentioned "the Slavic question" and remained the same as ever toward Poland. 1hr33m28s

The Heretics' Hour: Ray Goodwin reads Hitler's NOT so significant May 1944 address to military officers

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2015-06-12 00:50
 
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June 11, 2015

The Fuehrer at the Platterhof Hotel on Obersalzburg July 4, 1944 to address a gathering of industrialists, ministers and military officers. In uniform from left, Erhard Milch, Albert Speer, Rudolf Schmundt (behind Hitler, who was killed in the bomb blast of July 20th), Nicolaus Von Below and Julius Schaub on far right.

This private address by Adolf Hitler to Generals and Officers that took place at the Platterhof Hotel on May 26, 1944 is very interesting but is NOT Hitler's “most significant speech” as has been falsely promoted by non-historian Veronica K. Clark. It wasn't even a speech! As he addressed the officers, he was sitting down comfortably in a room where they were also seated. He did not speak from a prepared text.

Less than two months later (pictured above), on July 4, 1944, he addressed others of his staff in the same room of the same hotel, which he used often for special meetings.

Watch "Hellstorm - The Documentary"

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2015-05-14 23:45

It's high time I mention this incredible feat of revisionist history produced by Kyle Hunt of Renegade Broadcasting Network. I finally set aside the time to watch it, and only got through half of it before something interrupted my viewing. When I returned to it I found I didn't have the stomach to continue. Two days later, I did watch the rest. I haven't watched it a second time, but I will have to do so. It's hard, but necessary.

Some comments I can make:

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Germany, World War II

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