Germany

Zschäpe defence continues to call for mistrial

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2013-06-05 18:13

The NSU murder trial resumed this week in Munich, Germany. This account was taken from The Local/Germany and Der Spiegel Online on Wednesday. -cy

Beate Zschäpe enters the courtroom for the 6th day, this time in a red blouse.

Zschäpe's lawyers are demanding termination of proceedings, based on what her lawyers say was an illegal pre-trial assumption of guilt, according to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

The defence point to statements by Chief Federal Prosecutor Harald Range, who they claim repeatedly described Zschäpe as a member of a “gang of killers,” “terrorist organisation” or “terrorist trio” after her arrest in 2011, before the criminal investigation had even begun.

The prosecution's case against Zschäpe, say her defence lawyers, is based on assumptions about her role in the trio and closeness to other members which have not yet been proved.

Günter Deckert released on May 31!

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-06-03 09:46

Welcome back to the battle, Günter!

Above: Sylvia Stolz was among those waiting to greet Gunter as he was released after serving his 5-month prison sentence for 'violating' Germany's strict holohoax laws. Sylvia and Günter are under umbrellas at right.

Below: Part of the welcoming party for Günter outside Mannheim Prison on a rainy day. Günter leaning on sign at right.

Bicycle Adventures of an Austrian Teen - Part Two

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-05-21 20:13

From Leopold Wenger's Trip Diary

The Great Ride to Nuremberg
for the N-S Party Convention of 1937

copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

Translated from the German by Wilfried Heink

Day one - passing the Dachstein mountains on the way to Schladming.


Sunday, August 29, 1937. My buddy Franz and I left Leoben at 6am. When passing the train station I suddenly discovered that I had left my canteen, full of tea, at home. I had no choice but to turn back.

We then continued. It was still cold, and also foggy; our clothes were soon damp. But the fog lifted and at Mauten we stopped for breakfast. Then a headwind picked up, making travel up the Schober Pass difficult. At the top we stopped at a farm to drink some milk; Franz encountered a little mishap but at 11:30 we arrived in Trieben. We did not stop, passed the Wörschach airport and at noon we were already passed Steinach. We rode through an open forest; later in open country with the sun beating down and stopped at an Inn in Diemlern for lunch. The ride from then on was boring, up to Gröbming when I noticed that the houses were different, almost flat roofs with boulders on them. We had climbed quite a ways up and now traveled downhill, the road condition changing. Passing Haus, we had our first glimpse of the Dachstein, with the peak hidden in clouds. At 4pm we arrived in Schladming; the town was celebrating the completion of a new church tower and we had problems getting through the crowds. Uphill from there, and at 4:30 we passed the border between Styria and Salzburg. We already had the Mandling pass behind us.

In half an hour we made it to Radstatt, having to push our bikes up a hill along the way. We looked for the hostel, found it outside the town and registered at 5:30. The pool was a welcome addition and in the evening a youth from Vienna joined us.

NSU Trial: Turkish "victims" are behaving and being treated like holocaust survivors

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2013-05-19 12:59

The following is an editorial commentary by Gisela Friedrichsen in Spiegel Online International dated May 13, 2013 titled "Victim's Lawyers Should Stop Fanning Outrage."

Relatives of the victims of the NSU terror cell were furious that the trial was adjourned last week so the judge could consider a defense motion of bias against him. But the victims' lawyers criticized this legitimate instrument. They are giving their clients exaggerated expectations and should know better.

A scandal! An insult! Another slap in the face of the victims! Such was the language that accompanied the decision by Munich's Higher Regional Court to cancel two sessions of the National Socialist Union (NSU) trial and not resume proceedings until this week. This came on the first day of the trial, when the defense entered two motions alleging bias: one directed at chief judge Manfred Götzl and the other against him and two fellow judges.

NSU Trial - Too many lawyers for too many plaintiffs makes for a circus atmosphere

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2013-05-19 09:15

May 19, 2013

Taken from Spiegel Online International (by Gisela Friedrichsen) which is doing a fair job of covering this trial for English readers. Pictured right is Beate Zschäpe on Day 3 of her trial, May 15. Highlights:

The trial resumed on Tuesday, May 14 "after an eight-day adjournment during which the court considered - and rejected - a defense motion to replace the judge on the ground that he was biased because he had ordered defense lawyers to be frisked before entering the courtroom."

Carolyn - No participant in the trial, including the Turkish "victim families" and their attorneys was searched - ONLY the three defense attorneys. Wow, talk about totally unnecessary, but it does serve to give the German people a sense of the bias of this court. On this 2nd day, the charges against the defendents were read out. The media plays up that there were "emotional gasps and sobs," etc. from the "victim family members" in the gallery.

New Motions

"On [the[ third day of the trial, the morning [was] focused on a purely legal problem -- who sits on the judge's bench. Motions against the judges are difficult. They have to be made straight after the charges have been read. A defense that botches this aspect of the trial is doing a bad job."

Category 

NSU trial, Germany, Race

May 8, 1945: As I remember ...

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-05-07 17:54

By Willy Wenger
May 5, 2013

I was in the final battle for Berlin - from the Seelow Heights up to the last bitter street fighting in the vicinity of the bunker of Adolf Hitler. All Berliners participated in this, the bloodiest battle on German soil. The city had already included for some days troops of the Red Army.

Knowledge of the possiblity of being liberated by the Twelfth  Army under the command of young General Walther Wenck must have been what gave us the hope and the courage to endure. But General Wenck came up only as far as Potsdam.

"Then was the terminus." Those were his words as I heard them from him in Geneva in 1966, a time that I was able to talk to him about it.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger (Part Two)

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2013-04-26 14:45

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

Part Two - Conclusion

From the Seelow Heights—April 1945

Back Home to Leoben, Austria—July 1945

By Willy Wenger

An officer-candidate in the German Luftwaffe, Willy Wenger was only 18 in 1945 when his “odyssey” began. He is now 86. His older brother Leopold Wenger was awarded the Knight’s Cross, Germany's highest military decoration.

Translation and Introduction by Wilhelm Kriessmann

Editing by Carolyn Yeager
copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

From April 20th onward - the final days of the Reich - 18 year old Willy Wenger was involved in the Battle for Berlin. His story continues right after receiving his first wound as he covered for German civilians trapped inside the cellar of a house. As he attempted a peek out the front door to check conditions, a Russian grenade exploded close to it. A grenade fragment struck his hand, bringing forth profuse bleeding.

For the time being we escaped hell; it was insanity what we tried to accomplish near the Sparre Platz next to a waterfront. (I still carry the grenade fragment in the ball of my left hand. I feel it only when I hit something accidentally.) We marched back to the Maikaefer barracks.

The long row of barracks on Chausseestrassee as it appeared in 1910.


I was sent to a first aid station to get properly bandaged and to receive a tetanus shot. Marching on, I was informed that it was the famous Hotel Adlon on the Unter den Linden, close to the Brandenburg Gate, where I could get help. With ruins and wreckage all around, I tried first to cross the wide Unter den Linden avenue – impossible with continual rocket fire from the Stalin Organ batteries. So I found the subway entrance and finally entered the Adlon, my first encounter with my future profession.

The Heretics' Hour: Comparing the German and Japanese surrender to the Allies

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-04-22 18:54
 
00:00

August 22, 2013

FM Wilhelm Keitel, Chief of Army (center) with Chief of the Luftwaffe Stumpff (left), Admiral Friedenberg of the Kriegsmarine (right) are forced by Eisenhower's threats to surrender to the Soviet Union on May 8, 1945 in Berlin-Karlhorst.

Why didn’t Hitler address the German nation considering its defeat as the Emperor Hirohito did in Japan? Why was Hirohito allowed to live and continue his reign, while Hitler and his party had to be eradicated totally? Why was Japan allowed to keep its industrial capacity and participate in world trade, but Germany not. One reason is the difference between Dwight David Eisenhower (the terrible "Swedish Jew") and Douglas MacArthur.

Carolyn also looks at the continuing media attention to the  “problem” of antisemitism and what to do about it. Friday, April 26 is the 100th anniversary of the rape/murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan by the Jew Leo Frank in Atlanta, Ga. The Anti-Defamation League was created 100 years ago to defend Frank and has been doing its best to prevent justice for Jews ever since.

Saturday Afternoon: On Hitler's birthday - He proves to be the world's most famous man

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-04-20 12:16
 
00:00

April 20, 2013

Adolf Hitler’s 124th birthday is celebrated with proof of his amazing popularity and face-name recognition. Examples of oratory by himself and by others praising him is read and commented on. Carolyn also brings up some news stories showing the abject fear exhibited by the enemies of mankind whenever a positive feeling toward Hitler might in some way be exposed by their institutions or media.

When all is taken into consideration, it’s clear that the German Führer is, at the very least, the single best-known historical personality in the world today.  I would say that’s quite a success story.

Image: An example of Hitler's amazing recognizability from only two shapes, demonstrating he has penetrated the consciousness of the entire world population.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-04-16 18:59

Exclusive at carolynyeager.net! This is the never-before-published true story of a young German soldier thrown into the battle of Seelow Heights in the last month of the Second World Warhow he survived against all odds and managed to return home.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

From the Seelow Heights—April 1945

Back Home to Leoben, Austria—July 1945

By Willy Wenger

An officer-candidate in the German Luftwaffe, Willy Wenger was only 18 in 1945 when his “odyssey” began. He is now 86. His older brother Leopold Wenger was awarded the Knight’s Cross, Germany's highest military decoration.

Translation and Introduction by Wilhelm Kriessmann

Editing by Carolyn Yeager
copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

For the 17-year-old high school student Willy Wenger, his brother "Poldi," squadron leader at SG10 of the German Luftwaffe, was an outstanding role model. Willy wanted to follow in the footsteps of this highly decorated Jabo* pilot, who was five years older than himself. In July 1942, Willy received his C license for glider pilots (pictured at right on glider) and in April 1943 at the Reichssegelflugschule Spitzerberg near Vienna, he earned the Luftfahrerschein (air pilot pass). (See picture below)

[*Jagdbomber: fighter-bomber ]

The war situation in the spring of 1943 made it necessary to call up the final classes of high school students to the services of the Home Anti-Aircraft Forces, or FLAK. Wenger’s high school class assembled at barracks within the steel plant of the Herman Goering Werke (later named Voest-Alpine) at Linz/Donau. School lessons continued but the young pupils also had to learn how to handle the 3.7cm anti-aircraft guns and all the additional equipment.

Above: Wenger earns his basic pilot's license in 1943 at the flying school at Spitzerberg.


Because of injuries at gun practices, Willy was able to spend a furlough at home in Leoben at the same time his older brother Leopold, the Luftwaffen pilot, also arrived back home for a short leave.

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