Germany

The Smoking Gun in the NSU Trial?

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-07-13 19:53

By Carolyn Yeager

All-glass facade of the new Kaufhof Department Store in Chemnitz, Germany.

Co-defendant in the bizarre NSU (National Socialist Underground) trial and also the prosecution's star witness, Carsten S. gave his testimony in early-to-mid-June in the Munich courtroom.

Update! see below

I have posted what's been said in the news media, for example here and here, but some details I only managed to talk about on a radio program, not recognizing at that time how important they would become.

The Der Spiegel International article of June 12, 2013 gave these details:

The NSU stands accused of murdering 10 people between 2000 and 2007.

Carsten S. had already admitted to procuring a gun for the murderous neo-Nazi trio known as the NSU.

[...]

the meeting referenced by Carsten S. took place in a café in the Galeria Kaufhof department store in Chemnitz. It was, in fact, during that meeting that Carsten S. handed over the Ceska handgun he had obtained for the trio -- a weapon that was used to kill nine of the 10 murder victims.

 [...]

He told the court that Ralf Wohlleben, a co-defendant who stands accused of providing material support to the NSU, knew that the trio had committed serious crimes. Wohlleben, S. said, spoke on the phone with the NSU trio in his presence and afterwards chuckled and reported that the three had shot someone.

Saturday Afternoon: Günter Deckert live from Germany

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-07-13 13:08
 
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July 13, 2013

Günter Deckert is Carolyn’s guest to talk about Germany-related issues, after he tells us all about his recent five months (Jan. 2 to May 31) spent in Mannheim Prison for “questioning the holocaust.” 

  • Majority of prisoners are foreigners, but one has an individual cell-room of one’s own;
  • Political prisoners are “bullied” by top administrators with restrictions on or denial of preferred reading material, letters and visits on the grounds of “rehabilitation”;
  • Angela Merkel’s strong stand against Brussels new shared banking proposals in eurozone will probably dissipate after the general elections in September;
  • Merkel’s complaints about the NSA spying by the U.S. are weak, but Social Democrat says spying on the EU is for economic advantage, not terrorism;
  • Less likelihood of an NPD ban, but the NSU will be used against the NPD beginning in September;
  • NSU bombshell? – Prosecution’s star witness inadvertently revealed the gun that allegedly killed the eight Turks was purchased after the first four were already dead (according to Compact magazine);
  • Thoughts on a world-wide pan-European movement based on White unity;
  • Günter recommended the article “Unruly Europe” by Mark Bruigh, in two parts at American Renaissance;
  • Hadding Scott calls in to ask about reports that Adenauer was forced by Eisenhower to agree to pay reparations to Israel.

Image: Günter Deckert speaking in Denmark in 2008.

The Heretics' Hour: To say Nazi or not to say Nazi - that is the question

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-07-08 18:36
 
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July 8, 2013

The controversy over the word “Nazi” rages on–as to whether it is a Jewish-invented epithet against the dignity of National-Socialism which should never be used,  or simply a shortened form that was coined and used by the National-Socialists themselves.  Carolyn uses examples to show that it is the latter, and also makes clear that “Nazi” has no relation at all to "Ashkenazi" Jews (the word said to have derived from Ashkenaz, a grandson of Noah in the Bible).

The 19th Century German Volkish Nationalism movement and how it culminated in the Third Reich is also looked at, including some of the “misunderstandings” of its aims.

Image: NSDAP symbol. “National” is pronounced Not-zee-o-nol in German,  giving rise to the term Nazi (Not-zee).

Eyewitness to forced repatriation of Russian refugees by U.S. Army

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2013-07-07 12:30

R. R. Davison served as an American rifleman in World War II and later got a university education (probably on the GI Bill), eventually becoming a professor of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University. In 1983, he wrote the following letter to the editor at the Wall Street Journal.

[I confirmed Davison's identity by doing a search and coming up with this page http://books.google.com/books/about/Methyl_Alcohol_as_Motor_Fuel.html?id=Z1YaMwEACAAJ where I found the following information:

*A book by R.R.Davison published by Texas A&M University in 1974: Methyl Alcohol as Motor Fuel.

*Extraction Or Destruction of Chemical Pollutants from Aqueous Waste Streams, R. R. Davison, Environmental Protection Agency, 60pp, 1977.

*Economic Feasibility of the "Solaterre" System, on "Solar Energy," R.R. Davison, W.B. Harris, J.H. Martin, 58 pp, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University.]

I Thought Americans Were Good” 9-23-83

I have a question and an appeal regarding the Sept. 6 editorial page article on the post-WWII Russian refugee tragedy. Why does not someone, using the Freedom of Information Act if necessary, write a definitive history of the U.S. participation in this atrocity?

In August of 1945, I was a 19-year old rifleman in Company G 318th Infantry stationed in Kempten, Germany. One Sunday morning we were ordered into formation and issued ammunition. The company commander explained that our government had promised to return all the Russians that had entered Germany between certain dates. The Russians were refusing to go. Some had committed suicide and others had taken refuge in an orthodox church, claiming they would die there rather than return to Russia. Our orders were to load them on trucks for deportation, even if we had to kill them. Then the CO added that Stalin had promised that they wouldn't be harmed. A low laugh rippled through the formation, and to me that laugh is more significant than the brutality that followed.

Leopold Wenger's first letters from Napola Köslin, April-May 1939

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-06-25 12:13

Leopold Wenger (right) and Gilbert Geisendorfer in their Hitlerjugend uniforms at the train station in Leoben embarking on a new adventure.


 

Background: Leopold Wenger and his best friend Gilbert Geisendorfer read in a newspaper that there were openings for young men in the National Political Educaton Institute at Köslin in Pomerania. They talked about it and decided to apply. Together, they reasoned that if they did not pass the entrance exam the world would not end and they would have seen Berlin, the capitol city of the Reich.

They traveled by train from Leoben to Berlin-Potsdam, where the evaluation and testing took place. Both did pass and were then transported from Potsdam to their new school at Köslin. Leopold was 18 years old at this time. In the following letters to his family, he describes his first month in this new and different environment. More of his letters, up until November 1939, will be posted here as they are translated.

copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

Translated from the German by Wilfried Heink

Letter of April 20, 1939: Based on my excellent performance in science and sports, I was admitted to NAPOLA (National political education program) in Köslin. Only 230 of the 800 applicants were admitted for testing; 60 youngmen (jungmännen) were selected for grades 7 and 8 and, because of my test results, I was accepted into grade 8 even though I had never completed grade 7.

The tests were not what I had expected. They were regular classroom lessons and each one of us was evaluated based on performance. High-ranking SS officers were present, as well as a General of the Luftwaffe. Medical examinations were performed three times: a general assessment; fitness for flying (a turnstile and a catapult); and suitability for the SS (racial).

I travelled to Berlin a few times and was able to visit the Garrison church in Potsdam, the grave of Frederic the Great as well as the castle Sanssouci. On the 18th we drove to Berlin via the Avus, then on the Autobahn to Stettin [close to the Baltic Sea], and to Küstrin, and our new home.

Die Anstalt (the campus at Köslin)


The Heretics' Hour: "Truth movement" secondary to political agenda

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-06-17 20:03
 
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June 17, 2013

Carolyn says we are in a political struggle, and this political struggle dominates every search for  truth that we may sincerely be engaged in. “Democracy,” as represented by Barack Obama, has brought about a border-less world, rampant “terrorism” and total 24-hour surveillance. What does truth mean in such an environment?

  • The God-like status of Barack Obama in Germany and the extraordinary security measures taken for his June 18-19 visit;
  • New testimony at the totally political National Socialist Underground “murder” trial is both surprising and meaningless;
  • Pasquale di Fabrizio should be “truth researcher” Jim Fetzer’s worst nightmare;
  • Two Jeff Baumans:  curly-haired tall guy in picture (right) and straight-haired stockier guy as amputee hero;
  • Selective evidence at Clues Forum–and truth mixed with mis-direction–that’s disinfo;
  • Reader says the solution to “Elie Wiesel in Buchenwald” is to find Lazar Wiesel–or at least traces of him;
  • Questions on the Questionaires from Buchenwald do not bring anything conclusive;
  • Only real solution is to put people on the witness stand, under oath, with cross-examination.

Image: “Jeff Bauman” holding his thigh in place as he’s rolled down the street to … ? We never see him get into an ambulance. Here is the page with gif of leg falling off?

Anglo-German Naval Agreement of June 18, 1935

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-06-15 18:50

The great battleship Bismarck was launched on Feb. 14, 1939 at Hamburg.

Adolf Hitler proclaimed June 18, 1935 the happiest day of his life. It was because the naval agreement his government sought with Great Britain, the A.G.N.A., was signed. Hitler saw it as the beginning of an alliance between the two nations against France and the Soviet Union—the beginning of the partnership that he was seeking between the “leading” nations of Europe: Germany and England. These two, Great Britain by sea and Germany by land armies, would share the burden of defending Europe from all enemies.

It also released Germany from the Treaty of Versailles in the area of naval rearmament. Under the 1919 treaty, Germany was allowed no submarines, no naval aviation, and no battleships. The total naval forces allowed to the Germans were six each heavy and light cruisers, 12 each destroyers and torpedo boats. 

Germany had continued through the years to protest these restrictions, demanding that either all of Europe disarm down to German levels, or Germany be allowed to rearm to their level. Every German government of the Weimar Republic , preceding Hitler's Third Reich, had been implacably opposed to the terms of Versailles; the British were well aware that the terms were unjust, unstable and indefensible. It was France that always vetoed any relaxation.

Uwe Böhnhardt's mother testifies at parliamentary commission

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-06-08 16:49

The following article was published on June 7, 2013 in Der Spiegel Online.

Right-Wing Terror: Neo-Nazi's mother sheds light on his disappearance

By Julia Jüttner in Erfurt, Germany

Uwe Böhnhardt's mother testifies before the NSU Parliamentary Investigative Committee on Thursday.

The murderous (how do they get away with this?) neo-Nazi group National Socialist Underground vanished from sight in 1998. On Thursday, the mother of one of the group's members told investigators her version of the events leading up to her son's disappearance.

Peter Böhnhardt was just 17 years old when his lifeless body was deposited outside the door of his parents' house in the eastern German city of Jena. The circumstances surrounding his death have never been completely solved. Jürgen and Brigette Böhnhardt suspect that their son fell while climbing on castle ruins nearby and that his friends, afraid of any consequences, dropped his body off on the asphalt during the night.

That happened in 1988. On Thursday, a quarter-century later, Brigitte Böhnhardt sat in Room 101 of the parliamentary building of the eastern state of Thuringia, in the capital city of Erfurt. A tall woman, she speaks in a soft but surprisingly high-pitched voice. The 65-year-old teacher is the first relative of a suspected member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU), the neo-Nazi terror cell that killed 10 people from 2000 to 2007, to be questioned in public.

Zschäpe defence continues to call for mistrial

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2013-06-05 18:13

The NSU murder trial resumed this week in Munich, Germany. This account was taken from The Local/Germany and Der Spiegel Online on Wednesday. -cy

Beate Zschäpe enters the courtroom for the 6th day, this time in a red blouse.

Zschäpe's lawyers are demanding termination of proceedings, based on what her lawyers say was an illegal pre-trial assumption of guilt, according to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

The defence point to statements by Chief Federal Prosecutor Harald Range, who they claim repeatedly described Zschäpe as a member of a “gang of killers,” “terrorist organisation” or “terrorist trio” after her arrest in 2011, before the criminal investigation had even begun.

The prosecution's case against Zschäpe, say her defence lawyers, is based on assumptions about her role in the trio and closeness to other members which have not yet been proved.

Günter Deckert released on May 31!

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-06-03 09:46

Welcome back to the battle, Günter!

Above: Sylvia Stolz was among those waiting to greet Gunter as he was released after serving his 5-month prison sentence for 'violating' Germany's strict holohoax laws. Sylvia and Günter are under umbrellas at right.

Below: Part of the welcoming party for Günter outside Mannheim Prison on a rainy day. Günter leaning on sign at right.

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