World War II

Eyewitness to forced repatriation of Russian refugees by U.S. Army

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2013-07-07 12:30

R. R. Davison served as an American rifleman in World War II and later got a university education (probably on the GI Bill), eventually becoming a professor of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University. In 1983, he wrote the following letter to the editor at the Wall Street Journal.

[I confirmed Davison's identity by doing a search and coming up with this page http://books.google.com/books/about/Methyl_Alcohol_as_Motor_Fuel.html?id=Z1YaMwEACAAJ where I found the following information:

*A book by R.R.Davison published by Texas A&M University in 1974: Methyl Alcohol as Motor Fuel.

*Extraction Or Destruction of Chemical Pollutants from Aqueous Waste Streams, R. R. Davison, Environmental Protection Agency, 60pp, 1977.

*Economic Feasibility of the "Solaterre" System, on "Solar Energy," R.R. Davison, W.B. Harris, J.H. Martin, 58 pp, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University.]

I Thought Americans Were Good” 9-23-83

I have a question and an appeal regarding the Sept. 6 editorial page article on the post-WWII Russian refugee tragedy. Why does not someone, using the Freedom of Information Act if necessary, write a definitive history of the U.S. participation in this atrocity?

In August of 1945, I was a 19-year old rifleman in Company G 318th Infantry stationed in Kempten, Germany. One Sunday morning we were ordered into formation and issued ammunition. The company commander explained that our government had promised to return all the Russians that had entered Germany between certain dates. The Russians were refusing to go. Some had committed suicide and others had taken refuge in an orthodox church, claiming they would die there rather than return to Russia. Our orders were to load them on trucks for deportation, even if we had to kill them. Then the CO added that Stalin had promised that they wouldn't be harmed. A low laugh rippled through the formation, and to me that laugh is more significant than the brutality that followed.

Anglo-German Naval Agreement of June 18, 1935

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-06-15 18:50

The great battleship Bismarck was launched on Feb. 14, 1939 at Hamburg.

Adolf Hitler proclaimed June 18, 1935 the happiest day of his life. It was because the naval agreement his government sought with Great Britain, the A.G.N.A., was signed. Hitler saw it as the beginning of an alliance between the two nations against France and the Soviet Union—the beginning of the partnership that he was seeking between the “leading” nations of Europe: Germany and England. These two, Great Britain by sea and Germany by land armies, would share the burden of defending Europe from all enemies.

It also released Germany from the Treaty of Versailles in the area of naval rearmament. Under the 1919 treaty, Germany was allowed no submarines, no naval aviation, and no battleships. The total naval forces allowed to the Germans were six each heavy and light cruisers, 12 each destroyers and torpedo boats. 

Germany had continued through the years to protest these restrictions, demanding that either all of Europe disarm down to German levels, or Germany be allowed to rearm to their level. Every German government of the Weimar Republic , preceding Hitler's Third Reich, had been implacably opposed to the terms of Versailles; the British were well aware that the terms were unjust, unstable and indefensible. It was France that always vetoed any relaxation.

May 8, 1945: As I remember ...

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-05-07 17:54

By Willy Wenger
May 5, 2013

I was in the final battle for Berlin - from the Seelow Heights up to the last bitter street fighting in the vicinity of the bunker of Adolf Hitler. All Berliners participated in this, the bloodiest battle on German soil. The city had already included for some days troops of the Red Army.

Knowledge of the possiblity of being liberated by the Twelfth  Army under the command of young General Walther Wenck must have been what gave us the hope and the courage to endure. But General Wenck came up only as far as Potsdam.

"Then was the terminus." Those were his words as I heard them from him in Geneva in 1966, a time that I was able to talk to him about it.

May 8th German Capitulation Day - how legal is it?

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-05-06 20:22

This instrument of surrender was signed on May 7, 1945, at Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's headquarters in Rheims by Gen. Alfred Jodl, Chief of Staff of the German Army. At the same time, he signed three other surrender documents, one each for Great Britain, Russia, and France. Signatories: On behalf of the German High Command. JODL. IN THE PRESENCE OF: On behalf of the Supreme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force. W. B. SMITH On behalf of the Soviet High Command. SOUSLOPAROV. Witnessed by F SEVEZ Major General, French Army. For an enlarged version, go here.

On May 7, 1945 the German Instrument of Surrender was signed in Rheims, France by representatives of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force [US and UK] together with the Soviet High Command. Those signing were Alfred Jodl of the OKW, Walter Bedell Smith of the Western Allies, and Ivan Sousloparov of the Soviet Union.

On May 8, a second signing took place in Berlin by representatives of the three armed services of the OKW [Keitel, Stumpff and Friedeberg] and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army. French and US representatives signed as witnesses.

While it was in three languages, the document states that only the English version was considered authoritative.

Tag der Kapitulation in Germany is known in the West as VE Day (Victory in Europe).

Category 

World War II

Saturday Afternoon: Questioning and separating the real from the fake

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-04-27 13:35
 
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April 27, 2013

A mix of subjects ranging from the Boston Marathon bombing – to the pure propaganda play of a 20th Anniversary of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC – to the Czech treatment of Germans in May 1945 and since. Some of the points made:

  • Are the “victims” we see on television and in photos actors hired to participate in a drill;
  • Media fakery is becoming more believable to more people, and fits the political climate;
  • All-Jewish-run museum in United States claims right to offer a National Tribute to Holocaust Survivors with Elie Wiesel and Bill Clinton speaking;
  • Special award given to Susan Eisenhower (in honor of her grandfather “Ike”) and Polish Jew Wladyslaw Bartoszewski;
  • Outrageous lies and nonsense featured at holocaust museum’s special exhibition Some Were Neighbors;
  • Thirty-five million visitors since museum opened – 1/3 from schools (forced attendance);
  • Stop contributing to Mark Weber’s IHR and donate to Vincent Reynouard instead.
  • Willy Wenger tells in his WWII memoir about his own experience with Czechs when traveling through the new Czech Republic on his way home to Austria;
  • Hadding Scott joins the program in the last half hour to comment on German treatment of Poles from 1939-1944 and on whether German dominance in Europe is natural.

Image: Toy ‘Nazi’ figurines are supposed to show the “demonic appearing in the most minute details” at the USHMM special exhibition titled, “Some Were Neighbors, “ meant to keep the guilt trip going.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger (Part Two)

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2013-04-26 14:45

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

Part Two - Conclusion

From the Seelow Heights—April 1945

Back Home to Leoben, Austria—July 1945

By Willy Wenger

An officer-candidate in the German Luftwaffe, Willy Wenger was only 18 in 1945 when his “odyssey” began. He is now 86. His older brother Leopold Wenger was awarded the Knight’s Cross, Germany's highest military decoration.

Translation and Introduction by Wilhelm Kriessmann

Editing by Carolyn Yeager
copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

From April 20th onward - the final days of the Reich - 18 year old Willy Wenger was involved in the Battle for Berlin. His story continues right after receiving his first wound as he covered for German civilians trapped inside the cellar of a house. As he attempted a peek out the front door to check conditions, a Russian grenade exploded close to it. A grenade fragment struck his hand, bringing forth profuse bleeding.

For the time being we escaped hell; it was insanity what we tried to accomplish near the Sparre Platz next to a waterfront. (I still carry the grenade fragment in the ball of my left hand. I feel it only when I hit something accidentally.) We marched back to the Maikaefer barracks.

The long row of barracks on Chausseestrassee as it appeared in 1910.


I was sent to a first aid station to get properly bandaged and to receive a tetanus shot. Marching on, I was informed that it was the famous Hotel Adlon on the Unter den Linden, close to the Brandenburg Gate, where I could get help. With ruins and wreckage all around, I tried first to cross the wide Unter den Linden avenue – impossible with continual rocket fire from the Stalin Organ batteries. So I found the subway entrance and finally entered the Adlon, my first encounter with my future profession.

The Heretics' Hour: Comparing the German and Japanese surrender to the Allies

Published by carolyn on Mon, 2013-04-22 18:54
 
00:00

August 22, 2013

FM Wilhelm Keitel, Chief of Army (center) with Chief of the Luftwaffe Stumpff (left), Admiral Friedenberg of the Kriegsmarine (right) are forced by Eisenhower's threats to surrender to the Soviet Union on May 8, 1945 in Berlin-Karlhorst.

Why didn’t Hitler address the German nation considering its defeat as the Emperor Hirohito did in Japan? Why was Hirohito allowed to live and continue his reign, while Hitler and his party had to be eradicated totally? Why was Japan allowed to keep its industrial capacity and participate in world trade, but Germany not. One reason is the difference between Dwight David Eisenhower (the terrible "Swedish Jew") and Douglas MacArthur.

Carolyn also looks at the continuing media attention to the  “problem” of antisemitism and what to do about it. Friday, April 26 is the 100th anniversary of the rape/murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan by the Jew Leo Frank in Atlanta, Ga. The Anti-Defamation League was created 100 years ago to defend Frank and has been doing its best to prevent justice for Jews ever since.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2013-04-16 18:59

Exclusive at carolynyeager.net! This is the never-before-published true story of a young German soldier thrown into the battle of Seelow Heights in the last month of the Second World Warhow he survived against all odds and managed to return home.

The Odyssey of Fahnenjunker Wenger

From the Seelow Heights—April 1945

Back Home to Leoben, Austria—July 1945

By Willy Wenger

An officer-candidate in the German Luftwaffe, Willy Wenger was only 18 in 1945 when his “odyssey” began. He is now 86. His older brother Leopold Wenger was awarded the Knight’s Cross, Germany's highest military decoration.

Translation and Introduction by Wilhelm Kriessmann

Editing by Carolyn Yeager
copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

For the 17-year-old high school student Willy Wenger, his brother "Poldi," squadron leader at SG10 of the German Luftwaffe, was an outstanding role model. Willy wanted to follow in the footsteps of this highly decorated Jabo* pilot, who was five years older than himself. In July 1942, Willy received his C license for glider pilots (pictured at right on glider) and in April 1943 at the Reichssegelflugschule Spitzerberg near Vienna, he earned the Luftfahrerschein (air pilot pass). (See picture below)

[*Jagdbomber: fighter-bomber ]

The war situation in the spring of 1943 made it necessary to call up the final classes of high school students to the services of the Home Anti-Aircraft Forces, or FLAK. Wenger’s high school class assembled at barracks within the steel plant of the Herman Goering Werke (later named Voest-Alpine) at Linz/Donau. School lessons continued but the young pupils also had to learn how to handle the 3.7cm anti-aircraft guns and all the additional equipment.

Above: Wenger earns his basic pilot's license in 1943 at the flying school at Spitzerberg.


Because of injuries at gun practices, Willy was able to spend a furlough at home in Leoben at the same time his older brother Leopold, the Luftwaffen pilot, also arrived back home for a short leave.

Saturday Afternoon: A visit with Shoabloger

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2013-04-13 12:01
 
00:00

April 13, 2013

Hasso Castrup from Denmark, creator of the new website Shoabloger is Carolyn’s guest. Hasso’s special hobby is translating French and German revisionist texts into English and Polish. Currently he is featuring the 2007 Horst Mahler interview by the Jew Michael Friedman, posting it in parts because of it’s length. Among the main topics discussed are:

  • Hasso’s mixed Polish-German family’s experience between the wars, and during & after WWII;
  • The 1943 Jewish uprising in Warsaw vs the August ’44 Polish uprising there;
  • How Poles were treated by the Germans and how German officials sought to identify ethnic-Germans or part-Germans;
  • Soviet/communist treatment of Poles vs. German ‘Nazi’ treatment of Poles;
  • The real Josef Beck and the real Jan T. Gross & the Jedwabne Affair;
  • Poland’s Jewish Problem in it’s many ramifications;
  • Are the present German-Polish borders set for all time or can there be a reconciliation that changes things;
  • Horst Mahler’s spiritual perspective on opposition between Germans and Jews.

Willy Wenger's Family Chronicle

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2013-04-03 09:49

The following is the continuation of the family history written by Willy Wenger that first appeared on March 14 under the title “the great hope: the German Reich.” Wenger was born in 1926 in Styria in the diminished independent nation of Austria, 'victim' of the Paris Peace Conference following WWI. Willy had a loving father and mother, and an older brother Leopold (named after their father) with whom he was very close. From the time Leopold Jr. first began to speak, he was called “Bibi” (a mispronounciation of Bubi by the child), a nickname that took hold with family and friends all the way through high school and beyond.

The Referendum of April 10th, 1938

By Willy Wenger

copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager

Translated by Hasso Castrup

Willy, Gretl and their mother standing in front of their apartment building on Referendum Day.


Several months ago we had moved from the Timmerdorfer-Straße to Dreierschützenstraße No.16 where we had a larger apartment that belonged to the municipality. It consisted of a kitchen, a pantry, a small room – a cabinet, as we call it in Austria – with two beds, and a spacious loggia opening on a large garden in the inner part of the massive block. There was also a large living room, and the parents bedroom, as well as a hall and the toilet. Gretl slept in a small bed in the parents' bedroom, while Bibi and I shared the cabinet. Our building accommodated the municipal baths, which had bath tubs and showers which we used frequently.

Election Day was Sunday, April 10, 1938, on Dad's 45th birthday. Many had predicted that the referendum would be a big success for the N-S regime, and with the end result, all doubts were gone: the people decided and the result was convincing. Never in history has there been such a clear result: In Leoben, the vote was 99.83 per cent in favor – the proof of the willingness of the Ostmark to join the German Reich.

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