World War II

Leopold Wenger's letters from the Eastern Front, Nov 1943-Feb 1944

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2014-03-19 17:20


Oberleutnant Poldi Wenger stands at his squadron's [13th/SG10] command bunker at Koskov, in Ukraine, in January 1944. Note their "red fox" insignia above the entrance.


copyright 2014 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager
Translated from the German by Carlos Whitlock Porter


VIENNA - Officers’ military hospital

3 October 1943: I had hardly gotten here when they stuck me in bed again, which didn’t hardly please me. I’m in a military hospital here, officers only. There are four of us to a room, all of them sick; there are no wounded, and it’s nowhere near as beautiful as Constance. Now, once again, I’ve got a thick bandage on my knee and once again, the famous black ointment “Ichtiol” on it.

A few days ago I travelled to Meersburg [on the other side of the Lake Constance], which Mom had described to me as being so beautiful. I’m very glad to have undertaken this short outing; I really didn’t regret it. [Poldi received a visit from a lady friend of some years standing, one of the Luftwaffe auxiliary personnel, whom he had met in France; they travelled together on the trip to Meersberg. -WW]

Here in Vienna, visits are only permitted three times a week; but I very much hope that Father and Mother will be able to make it here together. In other respects our superiors here are rather strict; nevertheless I hope [sentence cut off]

[I myself was in Linz an der Donau at this time, assigned to the anti-aircraft auxiliary personnel as an anti-aircraft gunner, where I also attended grammar school at the Humanities High School at Marburg an der Drau. I was supposed to go to Leoben on holiday in the next few days and wanted to spend the holiday with our parents there together with Bibi (Poldi). -WW]

"Hitler's Table Talk" Study Hour: Episode 2

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2014-03-13 16:09
 
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March 13, 2013

Carolyn Yeager and Ray Goodwin read and comment on the Sat. July 5th through July 15th, 1941 dinner table monologues by the German Fuehrer, as taken down by an adjutant and checked for accuracy by Martin Bormann. 59m. Some highlights from the program:

  • Russians do not naturally incline toward a Western, Aryan type of organized state;
  • Expansion into the East will create new tourist destinations reachable by autobahn;
  • Moscow must disappear and Bolshevisim be exterminated;
  • The dominion of natural law, no education in atheism, Christianity less tolerant than the ancient world;
  • Moral law governs the actions of Germans, making them uniquely capable of a revolution in religion;
  • Racial migrations, and “way of eating” a typically racial characteristic;
  • Stalin an extraordinary figure in history.

Image: July 1941. A proud time: Hitler with Field Marshal Keitel and Reichsmarschall Goering (far right) in conversation with Knight's Cross winner Werner Mölders (left). [click on image to enlarge]

The edition being used was translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens, published by Enigma Books, New York, and can be found as a pdf here.

New easy-to-read version: Dissenting opinion of Justice R.B Pal, Tokyo "war crimes" Tribunal

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2014-03-12 06:49

Carlos W. Porter has just completed the tedious task of reformating the entire Dissenting Judgement, in 11 parts, of Justice R.B. Pal from the Tokyo Tribunal of 1946-48, first published in 1999.

"Publication of Pal’s dissenting opinion at the Tribunal was prohibited during the Occupation years, and even after the allied Occupation was over and Japan had regained her independence, it failed to draw the attention of the Japanese except for a few who had special interest in the Tokyo Military Tribunal. In a word, it was almost forgotten among the Japanese.

Monument to Justice Radhabinod Pal in Japan

"One thing that Pal was especially concerned about regarding the war was the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On visiting Hiroshima in November 1952, four years after the Tokyo trial ended, he was reportedly shocked to know the meaning of the monumental inscription dedicated to the A-bomb victims:  “Sleep peacefully, for we shall never repeat the mistake." [we = the Japanese leaders -cy]

“Why should the Japanese apologize to the Japanese?” he said with resentment, “It is not the Japanese who dropped the atomic bombs.” I would like to know what he would have said or, for that matter, what judgment the Tribunal would have passed on Japan if they had known at that time about the Emperor’s order to stop a project by the Japanese military to build an atomic weapon. The Emperor reportedly said that Japan should not be the first to make and use such an inhuman device, and thereupon the Japanese Army, by instructions from General Tojo, immediately gave up its A-bomb production project even at the cost of a possible final victory, while the U. S. decided to develop such a weapon and actually dropped two of them on Japanese cities just to shorten the war." -Akira Nakamura

To read the 11 sections of the Pal Dissenting Opinion, please begin here. At the bottom of each web page there is a link to the next section.

Leopold Wenger's letters from Sicily and Lake Constance, June-Nov. 1943

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2014-02-23 15:02

Poldi Wenger's "beautiful" plane after being destroyed in an air attack and fire while parked in Marsa del Oro, Sicily on July 7, 1943


copyright 2014 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager
Translated from the German by Carlos Whitlock Porter

Notes from Poldi's brother, Willy Wenger:
The mission on 4 June 1943 was also Poldi’s last combat flight on the Channel coast and the letter to his mother dated 14 June 1943 was the last one from France, since he was transferred to Sicily on 15 June1943.

After the death of Hauptmann Frank LIESENDAHL, Oberleutnant Fritz SCHRÖTER took over command of the 10th Jagdgeschwader (Day Fighter Wing) JG 2 until 31 December 1942, after which Hauptmann Heinz SCHUMANN took over in April 1943 following SCHRÖTER’s transfer to Tunisia. In the meantime, the following name changes were made:

The 10th /JG 2 (Jagdgeschwader–Fighter-Bomber Wing) was renamed the 13th/ SKG10 (Schnellkampfgeschwader - Fast Bomber Wing)        Squadron Commander - Lieutenant Poldi WENGER

The 10th /JG 26 and the 10th /JG 54 were renamed the 14th/ SKG10
Squadron Commander – Lieutenant Colonel Erwin BUSCH

The newly appointed 15th/SKG10  --  Squadron Commander - Lieutenant Erhard NIPPA

The three squadrons formed the Second Group (Gruppe) of SKG10, the name of which was changed, as of December 1942, over the course of a reorganisation of the close combat flier units, to SG10 (Schlachtgeschwader – Ground Attack Wing)  ---  Group Commander – Hauptmann Heinz SCHUMANN

Transfer to SICILY
Take-off on 15.6.1943 at 13h53 with stopovers in Bourges, Istres and Albenga (near Allassio, Italy) on 16.6. to Pratrica di Mare near Rome. After refuelling, off to Capodichino near Naples on 17.6 over the Straits of Messina and Catania to Gerbini-West.

Throughout the entire stretch of 2,270 kilometers, Poldi’s first maintenance engineer Thielen had to sit crammed into the baggage compartment directly behind the pilot’s seat and must have needed a lot of endurance to sit hunched up in this cramped compartment for hours.

Taking off from the foot of Mount Aetna, they flew the first dive bomber and high-altitude bombing attacks against large Allied convoys in the Mediterranean and achieved great results. They bombed harbor installations on the island of Pantelleria from a VERY high altitude. The whole group flew hard missions against Allied invasion troops, particularly around Gela, achieving the first tank kill and damaging several landing craft. -WW

___________________________

Saturday Afternoon: More on Germany persecution with Dr. Andreas Wesserle

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-02-22 12:34
 
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February 22,2014

From whence comes the intense historical attacks on “the German people,” and why? Is it purely because of economic competition, or is there another level involved? Retired professor Andreas Wesserle talks about the genocidal residential bombing of Germany planned out by Winston Churchill and his "scientific advisor" Dr. F.  Lindemann (Lord Cherwell), whom also went after thousands of irreplaceable cultural-historical landmarks in some of the oldest German cities. Some highlights of the discussion:

  • The British Mosquito 2-engine fighter-bomber had the capacity to fly all the way to Germany and back, and outfly all German fighters at the time – thus the heavy bombers were not needed;
  • Erich Kern in the Swiss newspaper Die Tat in 1955 put the number of German civilian dead due to air attacks at 2 million, 5 thousand.
  • Initially, the Americans were only bombing legitimate war targets, like the Messerschmitt factory outside of Regensburg in 1943, but later also became genocidal;
  • The fate of the Eastern Jews: some came West, a million more in the Soviet east were dispatched by Stalin to Siberia;
  • The “Sophie Scholl fable” similar to the Anne Frank romantic stories;
  • Hans Scholl and the half-Russian Alexander Schmorell wrote pamphlets under the banner of the White Rose Society with text suspiciously similar to Soviet propaganda and the Nuremburg Tribunal findings.

Image:  Carpet bombing of the Munich Bogenhausen residential district in background, with St. Peter's at right foreground (Munich's oldest and most important parish) already gutted.(click to enlarge) More Munich pictures here, here and here.

Saturday Afternoon: Conversation with Margaret Huffstickler about Lies and Those Who Tell Them

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-02-15 12:23
 
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Feb. 15, 2015

Margaret Huffstickler joins me again to discuss the extent and nature of the LIES we loyal White have to deal with on a regular basis. Our topics ranged from Hollywood movies to Internet gossip on Facebook, and much in between.

Leopold Wenger's letters from France, January-June 1943

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2014-02-11 20:52

Leopold Wenger, Jr climbs into the cockpit of his plane as he talks with his mechanic. In April '43, Poldi was made squadron leader.


copyright 2014 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager
Translated from the German by Carlos Whitlock Porter

4 January 1943: We had some very strong wind and monstrous sea swells in the past few days. Heavy surf on the coast, like you hardly ever saw. I didn’t even celebrate New Year’s Eve at all this time. I was already in bed by 22 hours, since we wanted to convey our New Year’s Best Wishes to the tommies really early in the morning. But once we got outside on New Year’s Day, you couldn’t fly at all, the weather was so bad. So on the 2nd we bombed a small town, Knightbridge, until there was not much left of it. I took really good photographs during this attack. We were over there again yesterday. This time it was Shanklin’s turn to get it, a city on the Isle of Wight. The flak was quite accurate, but too late. Once again, we got good photos of the attack.

A deep attack was made into Knightbridge on Jan. 2nd (above) and on Jan. 3rd, Shanklin (below). Photos from Poldi's on-board camera.

Saturday Afternoon: February '45 Allied War Crimes - Steuben Sinking and Dresden Bombing

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-02-08 12:49
 
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Feb. 8, 2014

Map shows the three greatest maritime disasters in history, all in early 1945 – a total of 20, 660 fatalities!

Dr. Andreas Wesserle returns as Carolyn’s special guest after a 3-year absence to discuss a letter to Queen Elizabeth II and a  paper on RAF and USAF strategic bombing  history he has written. Dr. Wesserle has been on The Heretics” Hour six times previously (when it was at Voice of Reason); his last appearance was Feb. 21, 2011.

About Dr. Wesserle: Born in Prague, he was a member of the Karpatendeutsche community in Slovakia and experienced the tyranny of the partisans in Sept. 1944. He emigrated to the United States from war-torn, refugee-filled West Germany with his parents in 1952. They settled in Wisconsin, where he still lives after a distinguished teaching career in U.S. and European universities. Highlights:

Leopold Wenger's letters from France, July-December 1942

Published by carolyn on Tue, 2014-01-21 16:31

Poldi (on right) with squadron buddies having some fun for the camera showing off their new sweaters with the "Red Fox" squadron emblem.


copyright 2013 Wilhelm Wenger and Carolyn Yeager
Translated from the German by Carlos Whitlock Porter

29 July 1942: Today I’m back at our home port with my squadron leader and a small staff of technical personnel in readiness. I still have to do three days standby service and then I’ll be flying back to our home port and will be relieved by another squadron there.

Today I flew my first mission again. We attacked the port of Brixham again, where our leader was lost on 17 July. It was 16 hours 19 minutes when I flew through the harbor barriers, which consisted of 20 to 30 barrage balloons, with my wingman in a low-level attack, shot up a few small ships and aimed a direct bomb hit at the stern of a 4000 ton freighter. Unfortunately, I couldn’t see what effect it had, since their defenses kicked in quickly and the flak was being aimed very precisely. They made a lot of noise during the night when their bombs went off. As we flew off, we were pursued by a few Spitfires, but we were faster. On the high seas, I saw still another small tugboat. Our cannons spoke very clear language. We left it there, letting off a big column of smoke. So I was in the same harbor twice in the same day, today, in which I had already sunk one watch ship already. Today’s freighter was also seriously damaged, that’s for sure.

Category 

Germany, World War II

Saturday Afternoon: Shoah business turning again to "shock and awe"

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2014-01-18 12:44
 
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Jan. 18, 2014

British Army Film Unit  footage of entry into Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, and following  events,  was turned into a shocking film that was never shown. Now it will be.

  • Jason Kenney, Canadian Minister for Multiculturalism:   “There is some kind of moral obligation on the entire world to support a secure homeland for the Jewish people–given not just the Holocaust, but the entire history of anti-Semitism. Both in Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere”;
  • Brendan O’Neil blogs that holocaust “deniers” and revisionists should not be censored “because it gives the impression that mainstream society is defensive and must prevent people from questioning what happened.” Right On, Brendan!;
  • Will Elie Wiesel be absent from this year’s Auschwitz-Birkenau January 27 Commemoration … now being called the anniversary of the “liberation of Europe”;
  • Redigitalized version of “unseen Hitchcock documentary” film of British and American troops entering the German concentrations camps is being brought out for the 70th Anniversary of the “liberation of Europe;”
  • The British film’s narration is full of factual untruths, snide comments and pure hatred for Germans, thus it will be accompanied by a new film “explaining it,” titled Night Will Fall;
  • Shock events like Sandy Hook have anomalies and stupidities built into them to attract the more intelligent, independent-minded among us to discuss “conspiracy theories” for years rather than address the far more important problem of White displacement, loss of homeland and all financial resources.

Image:  The British put up this propaganda sign at the Belsen concentration camp in 1945, after its “liberation” … though they came at the request of the overwhelmed Germans, who were waiting for them. (click to enlarge)

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