Historical Revisionism

Jews in Britain “own” the Church of England, says report

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2019-11-24 14:40

By Carolyn Yeager

THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND HAS PUT OUT an authoritative document titled “God's Unfailing Word” that shockingly calls on Christians “to repent for centuries of antisemitism which ultimately led to the Holocaust,” according to The Guardian news of November 21.

The document says it seeks to promote a new Christian-Jewish relationship.

Justin Welby, the archbishop of Canterbury, wrote a foreward to the official document in which he said the chief rabbi of Britain Ephraim Mirvis, who was given the privilege of writing an afterword to the C of E report, was “a friend,” and his comments were received in a spirit of friendship, “however tough they are to read.” The two men are said to be personally close.

On the 75th Anniversary of the failed July 20 assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2019-07-19 00:27

By Carolyn Yeager

TRADITIONALLY, GERMANY'S CURRENT LEADERS LAY FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS IN the national colors of red and gold in the courtyard of the Bendlerblock, the large army headquarters in Berlin from where the plot leaders staged their attempted takeover of the German government and military known as Operation Valkyrie in 1944. It's still not known whether this year's 75th commemoration will be a more elaborate affair.

President of Germany bows his head in remembrance of the failed conspirators during a past July 20th commemoration ceremony at the Bendlerblock Army headquarters in Berlin.

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July 20 plot

Nasty treatment of Germans, Italians in British POW camp unearthed by Sheffield archaeology team

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2019-07-04 15:30

A painting by Heinz Georg Lutz while a prisoner at Lodge Moor POW camp in Scheffield, England. Lutz was an architect and ex-Wehrmacht officer who was confined in the camp September 1945-April 1948. He made several linocuts and watercolour sketches of the camp and the area around it. Credit: Picture Sheffield


By Carolyn Yeager

REMAINS OF THE LARGEST PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN BRITAIN, housing at least 11,000 Germans and Italians at its peak in 1944, has been uncovered by archaeologists from University of Sheffield.

The site is overgrown with woodlands and was forgotten for more than 60 years.

Final installment from The Fatherland—Germany enforces total U-boat blockade

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2019-06-09 20:37

ON FEBRUARY 1, 1917, THE GERMAN HIGH COMMAND resumed submarine attacks on neutral ships in British waters. Their goal was to so devastate neutral shippers that they would become unwilling to trade with the Allies. Germany hoped that would inflict on Britain the same pain Germany itself had been suffering and force the Allies to come to terms. The Germans knew that this was a risky gamble because it could draw the United States into the war, but they hoped to bring the Allies to their knees before US involvement became significant.

In the map above, the shaded portion shows the extent of the German war zone.


Vol 6 no. 2    Feb. 14, 1917     Page 6

Wilson breaks relations with Germany; 'The Fatherland' takes new name

Published by carolyn on Fri, 2019-06-07 01:32

Headline on Feb. 3, 1917 after President Wilson spoke to Congress and the nation about his decision to react as promised to Germany's resumption of a more aggressive submarine warfare.


BEGINNING WITH THE FEB. 14, 1917 issue, THE FATHERLAND became THE NEW WORLD, saying they were making the change "to avoid misunderstanding and unnecessary provocation." On February 3rd, President Wilson had declared to Congress that the U.S. had broken off diplomatic relations with Germany because of its announced change in submarine warfare policy. Ambassador Bernstorff was given his passports by the State Dept. and sent back home to Germany. Everyone knew this brought us that much closer to a declaration of war.

Little hint yet of dramatic events about to break

Published by carolyn on Sat, 2019-05-25 23:09

This once secret British document depicts the general situation of minefields surrounding Great Britain on August 19, 1918. Enlarge


BECAUSE OF PRINTING DEADLINES, EVEN IN THIS LAST THE FATHERLAND NUMBER that came out on 7 February, 1917 there was no hint of the surprise U.S. break in diplomatic relations with Germany that was announced in Congress on 3 February.

In this issue, Capital correspondent Frederick F. Schrader once again writes the most pithy and informative account of the political situation: just how close America was to forcing peace on the belligerents, yet how active the powerful pro-British lobby was in keeping the war going.

Talk of peace in January 1917 raises hopes, proves deceptive

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2019-05-22 12:17

The "Peace Dove" of the Entente -This caricature was originally published in the 28 January 1917 issue of the satirical German journal Kladderadatsch. The “peace dove” of the Entente is portrayed as a vulture carrying a map of Europe showing the areas to be "severed from the German Reich."


FOLLOWING PRESIDENT WILSON'S "SERMON ON THE MOUNT," as it was dubbed by The Fatherland Editor George Sylvester Viereck—that is, his speech to the Senate on Jan. 22 laying out his ideas for peace—the talk in Washington and in the country was of a positive nature. It was felt that the position of Germany was strengthening and that that nation was gaining in good will. The belief in a coming peace was palpable. This turned out to be deceptive, or at least, not to last. Below is some of what was published in that upbeat tone in the next to the last issue that was to be published under the name of THE FATHERLAND. -cy

Wilson addresses Senate; proposes Monroe Doctrine 'for the world'

Published by carolyn on Sun, 2019-05-19 23:39

President Woodrow Wilson addressed “the people of the countries now at war,” in a highly-publicized speech to the US Senate on January 22, 1917. He called for 'peace without victory' and a Monroe Doctrine for the world.


AFTER WILSON IS INAUGURATED INTO HIS 2ND TERM, he seems to sincerely turn his mind toward peace efforts. His idealism doesn't go over well with the Allies, for whom peace at this time would not give them what they want. Instead they are ramping up their propaganda efforts to bring the United States into the war.  At the same time, Germany has decided it must ramp up its submarine warfare with the aim of blockading British shipping in order to force England to the peace table. The editor of The Fatherland does not see what's coming; the poet in him waxes optimistic about Wilson's speech in the January 31 Fatherland issue. But first, the more down-to-earth Frederick Schrader tells us the mood and pro-war activity in America just before the President's important speech. -cy

More revelations of Anglo-American crimes as condemnation is heaped on Germany

Published by carolyn on Wed, 2019-05-15 23:48

IN THE JANUARY 24, 1917 ISSUE OF THE FATHERLAND, which will cease publishing under that name with the February 7th issue, the unsuspecting editors are still exposing the hypocritical nature (to put it kindly) of prominent pro-British, pro-Allies spokesperson Elihu Root. This former Republican senator from New York was President Theodore Roosevelt's Secretary of War during the Philippine-American War (1899-1902) when many atrocities were carried out against the Filipinos. Knowledge of that was prevented from reaching the American public. Writer Franklin Schrader uncovered secret documents and exposed them perhaps for the first time, at least for most Americans. The second article below adds to what was revealed in my prior post on Elihu Root's conduct of the war. But first, another “crime” revealed by a Fatherland reader. -cy

vol. 5 no. 22 Jan. 3, 1917 Page 4

ENGLAND BREAKS ANOTHER PACT

Letter to the Editor of The Fatherland

Sir:

In the issue of October 18th in an article written by Mr. C.A. Collman THE FATHERLAND drew attention to the scandalous robbery going on in Nigeria where German property, real estate, warehouses, factories, wharves, residential sites, etc., etc., are to be forcibly sold by auction.

'The Fatherland' exposes ruthlessness of US conduct of Philippine War under Germany-critic Elihu Root

Published by carolyn on Thu, 2019-05-09 20:27

Elihu Root was the United States Secretary of War, and of State in the Republican Roosevelt administration, and a Senator from New York from 1909 to 1915. He was a major critic of Germany's alleged war crimes. 


vol. 5 no. 21    Dec. 27, 1916    Page 3

ELIHU ROOT'S RECORD OF BARBARISM

An Exposure of His Ruthless Conduct of the Philippine War Vouched for by Charles Francis Adams, Carl Schurz, Edwin Burritt Smith and Herbert Welsh, Committee—Belgium a Sham and Pretext—Root's Inhumanity Proven

By Frederick Franklin Schrader

THE PUBLIC SHOULD WELL UNDERSTAND that the meeting to protest against the deportation of Belgians, held in Carnegie Hall, New York, on the evening of December 15, was not prompted by sentiments of humanity, but by hatred of Germany on the part of a notorious clique of old offenders, headed by Elihu Root, James M. Beck, Roosevelt, Rev. Dr. Manning, Joseph H. Choate, George Haven Putnam, and others who, ever since the first gun was fired, have been the principal agitators for American intervention. [New York Times writeup of the meeting here] The majority of these men are long past middle age. They are not going to fight themselves, but they want others to fight for England.

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